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Re: Windows 7 Blue Screen Of Death help please

I tried 3 sets of RAM before updating samething happened, Only two things I have never changed are MB\CPU everything else has.

Case: Corsair Carbide 500r/MB: Asrock Z68 Extreme4 Gen3/CPU: i5 2500k/GPU: XFX HD7950 DD/Cooling: Corsair H80/Ram: Kingston HyperX 8GB/PSU: Corsair HX850w / 2TB Seagate Sata3 HDD+250GB Samsung Evo/Audio: Asus Xonar DS/Corsair Vengeance 1500
Steam-shankly1985 - Psn-shankly1985
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Message 21 of 28 (250 Views)
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Re: Windows 7 Blue Screen Of Death help please

Why is this in the Ps3 section >:smileyfrustrated:
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Message 22 of 28 (246 Views)
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Re: Windows 7 Blue Screen Of Death help please

Has it ever happened to your PC? If it did you would post anywhere to get help trust me lol

 

 


Tahvo wrote:
Why is this in the Ps3 section >:smileyfrustrated:

 

Case: Corsair Carbide 500r/MB: Asrock Z68 Extreme4 Gen3/CPU: i5 2500k/GPU: XFX HD7950 DD/Cooling: Corsair H80/Ram: Kingston HyperX 8GB/PSU: Corsair HX850w / 2TB Seagate Sata3 HDD+250GB Samsung Evo/Audio: Asus Xonar DS/Corsair Vengeance 1500
Steam-shankly1985 - Psn-shankly1985
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Message 23 of 28 (242 Views)
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Re: Windows 7 Blue Screen Of Death help please

im confused as to why this is even in a games forum and not a pc forum or MS forum

 

try changing your ram around take a module out see if it still happens 1 of you memory modules could corrupted had the same problem with my brothers ex lappy took a memory module out and fixed the blue screen try doing that

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Message 24 of 28 (230 Views)
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Re: Windows 7 Blue Screen Of Death help please

Begin rant: It's bleeding obvious that this doesn't belong in the PS3 General Discussion; there's no need to point it out, and let's leave the moderation to the moderators, ok? It's always the same small group of people moaning, playing back seat moderators. Sometimes I wonder if they are simply sed and awk scripts which auto-reply as soon as certain conditions are met. Give it a rest. If a post completely ruins the forums for everyone, the moderators will do something about it. There are more annoying and painfully obvious "This is not on topic!!!!"-messages than there are annoying offtopic messages. Just think about that for a moment (hint: Does back seat moderation really help?). Am all for 100% on-topic, but it's never going to happen. Get over it. If you find off-topics and double-posts to be so deeply offensive, then use the report link. The real moderators will take the appropiate action if they think it's relevant. End rant.

 

Anywho, I don't want to simply post a rant, and I noticed that the replies so far haven't really adressed the actual event dump, so I'll take a quick look at it. First off, you always need to be systematic when doing proper problem solving, don't just randomly try things and see what sticks. Trial and error should always be the last resort.

 

Bug Check Code is 59 (decimal), which is 0x3b in hexadecimal. See this page for more information on that particular code. Essentially, a system service caused the exception (but be aware of that this can mean many things). Note the "Cause" section (did you upgrade graphics drivers just prior to the problems starting?).

 

The first parameter is 0xc0000005, which all those of us who have had the misfortune to do win32 developerment knows means "access violation", which means that the mmu complained about a memory access. In a few cases, this is a symptom of bad memory circuits. The way to determine if it this is caused memory problems is pretty simple: Download the Ubuntu Live CD, boot from it, and when the bootscreen shows, select to run the memory test. If you are uncomfortable in doing that, there's a less good way to do it: Check all those generated events and see if they are random or if they show (sort of) the same thing all the time. If they are consistent, then don't worry about bad ram just yet. (Though I still recommend running the real memory tests, just to be sure).

 

The user token which caused the crash was S-1-5-18 (i.e. Local System).

 

Now, if all those events are identical (apart from things like the timestamp), then you can start looking through the list of system services (you can find these through one of those administrative mmc-console-thingies (under some "Administrative Tools"-folder?) which are run as Local System. Then try to figure out if any of them could be affected by any changes you did prior to when the problem started, and if there's any correlation to what you were doing at the time the machine crashed. (For instance, if you updated the sound drivers, the system tends to crash while listening to sound of any kind, and you have a service which uses the sound driver, then try to disable it temporarily. You'll lose some functionallity, but see if the system becomes more stable). Also note that disabling services can have some pretty drastic effects on your system (not always in a good way). There are plenty of guides online which describe which services are safe to disable, and which are not (which side effects will folllow, etc).

 

If you're getting pretty random events, then it becomes more interesting (in a bad way). Some people claim that they installed new hardware and the PSU couldn't handle it all, which lead to the error. If this is the case, you'd be noticing it when you do things which increase power consumption in the system (like running a high-end game..). But I wouldn't get too focused on that particular issue; it can also be faulty hardware, bad drivers, etc. Possibly not good news, in other words.

 

A potentially huge hint could be to match the ProcessID in the event dump with the processes running in the system prior to the crash. If it always the same PID causing the problem (some processes may end up with the same PID at every boot). Bring up the task manager, configure it to show the PID (Process ID), and show all the processes. Make a note (read: screendump) of them all. Keep that list somewhere safe, and if the system crashes, try to correlate the PID in the task list with the ProcessID in the event dump.

 

Say each time your system boots up, lsass.exe gets PID=4. It's one of those processes which mustn't die, so it'll have the same PID as long as the system is up. Then you know it's LSA which is crashing, which would indicate that there's a problem with the authentication mechanisms, etc. This would be pretty bad, though, in this particular context. But it's the method which is important: Try to use the ProcessID in the event dump to match up with the PID in the task manager (like I said, you'll need to store the list somewhere prior to the crash, and you'll need to verify that this particular PID hasn't been reassigned between storing the list and the crash, which may be difficult unless it's a process which never terminates while the system, is up).

 

With any luck the events are very consistent, because then it's much easier to systematically try to figure out what's happening.

 

I do some of these things at my $DAYJOB. It can be pretty tedious, and it's somtimes about deduction, and ruling drivers/services out. And there are many ways to go about these kinds of problem solving missions. If you're not comfortable doing these kinds of "low level" things, it's better you find someone who is and let them do it.

 

I could try to dissect the data in that event dump and narrow it down better, but truth be told, I dislike Windows with a passion, and doing this at work is more than enough for me. But hopefully the information I provided can get you started. If you get really desperate, you could PM me and I'll see if I can guide you witha a little bit more detail. But like I said, I don't particularly find these things to be enjoyable, so PM me about this only as a last resort. (No correlation to the earlier Trial and Error comment :smileyhappy:.

 

If you want to be a little hardcore (grow some chest hairs!), then you can enable image dumping, then use a dump analyser on the image after the crash. Or - better yet - let someone else take a look at it. (Warning: If you hand over a complete dump to someone, you're handing over everything which was in RAM at the time of the crash -- including all passwords and personal information you have entered which hasn't been overwritten before the crash. So .. don't do it :smileyhappy:. If you know someone who can use the tools to read image dumps, then invite them over and bribe them to do it with a nice cup of tea. And keep track of what they are doing with your image dump..

 

Oh, and please at least use the "General Discussion" next time -- it's slightly more suited for these kinds of things.

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Message 25 of 28 (208 Views)
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Re: Windows 7 Blue Screen Of Death help please

life story did not read.

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There is a GT5 scammer on these forums.
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Message 26 of 28 (205 Views)
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Re: Windows 7 Blue Screen Of Death help please

[ Edited ]

Original poster:

 

Have a look at this: http://www.eventid.net/display.asp?eventid=41&eventno=10602&source=Kernel-Power&phase=1

 

Quote: "This event is simply recording the fact that the system was shut down ungracefully. It does not provide information on the source of the problem, but just the fact there is a problem. When this is happening there is a risk of data loss (the information still in the memory cache, that was not flushed to the hard disk). In most cases this indicates a serious problem with the operating system such as corrupted operating system files, faulty memory modules, faulty hardware drivers."

 

You'll need to look elsewhere in the 'System' log for a potential entry for the actual cause although it's not guaranteed. If it's 'blue screening', the error is often caused by some low level problem and the system may not have had an opportunity to write an event log entry or entries prior to crashing.

 

Suggestion: Look for EventID '12' in the 'System' log just after the time when the crash occurred and work back from there. EventID '12' is system startup. It's therefore likely that if anything relevant is logged, it will be just before this. Look for Level "error" and "critical" entries and make a note of the EventID numbers. Then go to: http://www.eventid.net and do a search for the specific EventIDs which you found.

 

Hope this helps you to work it out!

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Message 27 of 28 (200 Views)
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Re: Windows 7 Blue Screen Of Death help please

OP what Internet Security are you running??

 

I have windows 7 and found I was having BSOD with Norton and then with AVG Free Version.  I could only load up in safe mode.

 

It was down to the fact that both Internet Security packages were picking up certain win32 files to be viruses and crashing the system. I know use Avast free Security and haven't had a problem since

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